Turkey 2023 Agreement Saudi Arabia

The Ottomans had sovereignty over the two holy sites of Mecca and Medina and ruled Cyprus, Iraq, Syria, Libya and Greece. The time is close to the expiry of the Treaty of Lausanne on 24 July 2023. The end of the treaty will mark the revival of Turkish regional hegemony, because they will be free to drill in the Black Sea, the Eastern Mediterranean. The international community has begun to pay greater attention to Turkey`s efforts, particularly in view of the expiry of the Treaty of Lausanne. According to international law, any treaty expires after 100 years and Erdogan is working to link the expiry of this treaty in 2023 to the current situation in Mosul, northern Iraq, as well as Raqqa and Afrin in Syria. With the expiration of this century-old treaty in 2023, Turkey itself will enter a new era by drilling for oil and digging a new canal between the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara as a prelude to the costs of passing ships. This seismic evolution, combined with Turkey`s recent military adventurer, indicates that the geographical contours of the region will certainly undergo a gigantic metamorphosis after the end of the Treaty of Lausanne. The expiration of the Lausanne Treaty until 2023 has sparked a new debate among global geopolitical and geostrategic thinkers about how Turkey would respond to this tectonic shift. Will Turkey revive the Ottoman Empire? Will the geopolitical and geoeconomic map of the region change? Will Turkey assert itself again by using its relentless power and thus creating regional domination? Questions that are consenting to these and others are now part of any transnational discourse. The Treaty of Lausanne expires in 2023. This has sparked a debate about how Turkey sees the possibility and how it would act. Will it try to revitalize the Ottoman Empire or something similar in Europe? Are geopolitical maps drawn? Will Turkey project a hard power that will lead to regional domination? According to Mohamed Abdel-Kader Khalil, an Egyptian expert on Turkish affairs, „Turkish foreign policy in the Middle East is linked to the use of Turkish military capabilities in the region.

This is reflected in Turkey`s military concentrations on the borders with Iraq and Syria and their engagement on the Red Sea through an agreement on the Sudanese island of Sawken and the Turkish military intervention in the northern Syrian city of Afrin. „These military interventions are part of a previous Turkish intervention in northern Iraq with the intention of conducting combat exercises in several regional countries and signing military agreements with Arab and African countries. The idea is to expand Turkish relations abroad in order to promote military exports, maximize economic returns and increase regional influence on the basis of relentless power,“ he added: „Erdogan`s aggressive nationalism is now spreading beyond Turkey`s borders and aimed at taking land in Greece and Iraq. Among many agreements, there was a separate agreement with the United States, the Chester concession. . . .